Marketing
Business Lesson 4
New Vocabulary
Cold-calling
холодные звонки
Mailshots
массовая рассылка рекламы по почте
Social Media Marketing (SMM)
маркетинг в социальных сетях
Special promotions
специальные акции, предложения
Word-of-mouth
сарафанное радио
Pop-up adverts
всплывающая реклама
Customer Relationship Management (CRM)
система управления информацией о клиентах, организация взаимоотношений с клиентами
Customer experience
качество обслуживания клиентов
Customer loyalty
лояльность клиентов
Long-term customers
постоянные клиенты
Market share
доля рынка
Intrusive marketing
навязчивый маркетинг
Customer Centric Marketing
клиентоориентированный маркетинг
Promotion
продвижение
Retailer
розничный продавец
Cling
цепляться, держаться
Direct mail
почтовая рассылка
Consumer resistance
сопротивляемость потребителей
Unsolicited
непрошенный
Multichannel relationship
многоканальная связь
Promotion-centric
рекламно-ориентированный
Brick, click and flip
торговля в магазинах,интернете и по каталогам
Product-focused
товароориентированный
Interact
взаимодействовать; влиять друг на друга
Customer
клиент, покупатель
Data
данные, информация
Privacy
конфиденциальность
Buying behaviour
покупательское поведение
Privacy Policy
политика конфиденциальности
Market research
маркетинговое исследование, изучение конъюнктуры рынка
Advertise
рекламировать
Servicing
обслуживание
Delivery
доставка
Digital Marketing
цифровой маркетинг
Distribution
распространение
End user
конечный потребитель
Product launch
выпуск новой продукции на рынок
Public Relations (PR)
связи с общественностью
SWOT analysis
анализ сильных и слабых сторон, возможностей и угроз
Trademark
товарный знак, торговая марка
Brand
бренд
Consumer
потребитель, покупатель
Consumer retention
удержание потребителей
To modify the product
изменить (улучшить) продукт
Database
база данных
Integral
неотъемлемый, существенный
Capture
захватывать
Supply
предложение
Demand
спрос
To affect
воздействовать, влиять
Goods
товары
Services
услуги
Quantity supplied
объем предложения
Quantity demanded
величина спроса
Equilibrium point
точка равновесия
Market Clearing
равновесие рынка
Practise new vocabulary on Quizlet
Read the following article and practise new words and expressions
Customer-Centric Marketing
Most retailers cling to product-focused and promotion-centric models. However, there is increased consumer resistance to intrusive marketing, such as unsolicited e-mails and direct mail.

In response, some retailers are beginning to pay more attention to the customer experience and have adjusted their marketing practices so that they are delivering fewer, more relevant messages that reflect the multichannel relationship they have with the customer, e.g. retail stores, website, and catalogs, or "brick, click, and flip".

Switching to a customer-centric marketing approach helps to increase customer loyalty and as a result, customers will buy more from you over a longer period of time. Research by Bain and Harvard Business School shows that the longer a customer stays with you, the greater the annual profit generated from that customer. These increased profits come from a combination of increased purchases, cost savings in marketing, and word-of-mouth referrals.

The majority of multichannel retailers do not design their marketing programs around acquiring new customers that have the best potential to become long-term customers and rewarding existing high-value, loyal customers with special treatment in order to retain them. Instead, they wrongly focus on market share as the key measure of success.
Answer the questions to the text
You can compare your answers with answer key below
Listen to an interview with Dr Jonathan Reynolds, Academic Director of the Oxford Institute of Retail Management and lecturer at the Said Business School
Answer the questions to the audio 1
You can compare your answers with answer key below
Read the following article and practise new words and expressions
Brand Strategy for Generation Y "WALKING THE WALK"
THE MOST MARKETING-SAVVY segment a business will ever target is undoubtedly Generation Y. With no illusions about how much manufacturers covet their disposable income, the children of the eighties scrutinize any new brand on the block with icy cool. It's not enough just to talk the talk: only genuinely youth-oriented brands can also walk the walk.

So just how do top Gen-Y brands like Converse (shoes), Ben & Jerry's (ice cream) and Jet Blue (air travel) succeed where so many others fall? Their secret lies in establishing an emotional connection with their customers, a powerful, psychological attraction that allows these emotionally driven brands to nurture a special relationship and motivate purchase intent.

What are the brand-building strategies to help your business walk the walk? In every market segment, a strong brand not only attracts an initial purchase but also brings longer-term benefits like customer loyalty and premium pricing. But Gen Y-ers are especially influenced by brands that project an emotional appeal they can share in and exploit. For these consumers, a brand is a form of self-expression that communicates an identity to their peers. This emotional investment means that Gen Y-ers will support and recommend the brands they use: they willingly become brand endorsers, creating the kind of buzz that can make market share rocket.

To build an emotionally potent brand, first consider Gen Y-ers' values, and what benefits buying your brand will bring them. Then, fine-tune your brand by positioning it so as to satisfy your target customers' emotional needs: in particular, try to own the all-important 'lifestyle empowerment' brand position. Finally, learn from the Converses and Ben & Jerrys of this world by creating a sense of brand ownership — every truly successful brand in this market manages to foster the impression that it belongs to Gen Y-ers, and to them alone.
Practise new vocabulary on Quizlet
Answer the questions to the text
You can compare your answers with answer key below
Listen to an interview with Dr Jonathan Reynolds, Academic Director of the Oxford Institute of Retail Management and lecturer at the Said Business School
Answer the questions to the audio 2
You can compare your answers with answer key below
Watch the video and answer the questions
Answer the questions to the video
You can compare your answers with answer key below
Your homework is to write the summary of this topic, minimum 15 sentences, using new words and expressions
Write your own beautiful success story!
Translate the following sentences into English
the first set is mandatory
Compare your answers to the answer key
Answers to the text 1 questions
  1. Most retailers never cling to product-focused and promotion-centric models. FALSE
  2. There is decreased consumer resistance to intrusive marketing, such as unsolicited e-mails and direct mail. FALSE
  3. Some retailers are beginning to pay more attention to the customer experience. TRUE
  4. Multichannel customers spend three to four times more than single-channel customers do. NOT GIVEN
  5. Customer-centric marketing helps to increase customer loyalty and as a result, customers won't buy more from you over a longer period of time. FALSE
  6. The longer a customer stays with you, the greater the annual profit generated from that customer. TRUE
  7. The majority of multichannel retailers design their marketing programs around acquiring new customers. FALSE
  8. Multichannel retailers wrongly focus on market share as the key measure of success. TRUE
Audio 1 answer key
  1. Customer relationship management, or CRM as it's known for short, is, is really the whole collection of systems and processes that companies use to _____ . (interact with customers)
  2. Some people associate CRM with the software used to manage interactions, such as e-mails and __________. (telesales calling)
  3. CRM is a way for organisations to create more _________ businesses. (customer-centric)
  4. Where the customer experience is ________ of everything that the company thinks and feels about its market. (at the heart)
  5. Although CRM software seems systematic and mechanical, in a mass market it can help to record personal ________ . (differences and preferences)
  6. At the same time, it helps to manage interactions efficiently and provide a ________ to the customer. (consistent service)
Audio 1 tapescript
I = INTERVIEWER, JR = JONATHAN REYNOLDS

I: What is customer relationship management, and why is it important?

JR: Customer relationship management, or CRM as it's known for short, is really the whole collection of systems and processes that companies use to interact with customers. In some people's minds, CRM has been associated with software, and certainly, the software that companies use to manage their interactions, through e-mail, telesales calling and so on, is very important. But increasingly, I think we need to think about customer relationship management as being a much broader set of responsibilities for organisations; creating, if you like, customer-centric businesses, where the customer is at the heart of everything that an organisation thinks and feels about its market. Certainly, systematising the way in we think about customers might be thought of as a little mechanical. When you're dealing with a mass market, when you're trying to record, perhaps, very important personal differences and preferences, using some kind of systematic piece of CRM software, is very important to provide a consistent service to the customer.

Answers to the text 2 questions
  1. shy
  2. target
  3. desire
  4. high
  5. associates
  6. rumours
  7. occupy
  8. promote

Audio 2 answer key
1. 'The glass consumer' means that companies can see through us and know exactly how we behave and how we think.
2. There are three attitudes to privacy:
- the 'privacy fundamentalists' who are desperately concerned about the amount and quality of information that is held about them by companies, and really don't want that to, to continue, and want that to be legislated against.
- the 'privacy pragmatists' who actually recognise the reality is companies collect data about us, that's fine, we can live with that. It may even help us in terms of getting better offers in the long term.
- the 'privacy indifferents' who actually couldn't care less about what information is collected about them, and often are very unaware of what is collected.
3. your own answer

Audio 2 tapescript
I = INTERVIEWER, JR = JONATHAN REYNOLDS

I: How much data should companies have about their customers, and should we be concerned about privacy?

JR: There's a lot of discussion about privacy and its relevance to customers, given that more and more data is being collected by all sorts of organisations. Certainly, the e-mails I got coming through every day from everyone from airlines through to banks to grocers and booksellers, advertising things and knowing something about my buying behaviour, can be quite concerning. Indeed, it's been suggested that we're all 'glass consumers', that you know, companies can see through us and know exactly how we behave and how we think. On the one hand, that's concerning. On the other hand, in a sense, perhaps that helps companies to serve us better. One of the ways we can think about this is that there are three attitudes to privacy: there are the 'privacy fundamentalists' who are desperately concerned about the amount and quality of information that is held about them by companies, and really don't want that to, to continue, and want that to be legislated against. We then see the 'privacy pragmatists' who actually recognise, well, the reality is companies collect data about us, that's fine, we can live with that. It may even help us in terms of getting better offers in the long term. And then finally there are the 'privacy indifferents' who actually, you know, couldn't care less about what information is collected about them, and really often are very unaware of what is collected.

Video answer key
  1. The sneaker company would raise the price of the sneakers
  2. When they can sell it for a higher price
  3. A $20 bill
  4. Intersection
  5. Neither A nor B - the equilibrium point is set by market forces
  6. Consumers become less willing to spend money on goods and services
  7. Demand for sneakers would decrease
  8. A commercial in which the car is endorsed by a popular celebrity
  9. Low supply, high demand
  10. When supply and demand balance out
The first set
  1. The Corona BRAND is one of the top-selling beers worldwide.
  2. To check on information for SPECIAL PROMOTIONS and news please select the web site of the market where you reside.
  3. There are many tools you can use: blogs, social networks, forums... Want to lose an opportunity to build CUSTOMER LOYALTY?
  4. Oxfam is the largest RETAILER of second-hand books in Europe, selling around 12 million per year.
  5. It is also argued that DIRECT MAIL is not cost efficient.
  6. And a good CUSTOMER knows everything has its price.
  7. Jeff gave me his MARKET RESEARCH.
  8. Myriad Pictures bought the international DISTRIBUTION rights in May 2009.
  9. A brand remains: TRADEMARK is valid for 10 years and can often be extended arbitrarily.
  10. Other names used in reference to it include GENERATION Y (as it is the generation following Generation X) and "The Net Generation".


The second set
  1. Things are a little slow here, and there's only so much COLD CALLING you can do in a day.
  2. Rosen had noted that such sales would have viral WORD-OF-MOUTH spread across the Internet.
  3. Besides, participation in the exhibitions is a certain way to maintain communication with the LONG-TERM CUSTOMERS and attract potential ones.
  4. Further savings would accrue if other service desks were to be migrated to the common CUSTOMER RELATIONSHIP MANAGEMENT platform.
  5. TF1's average MARKET SHARE of 24% makes it the most popular domestic network.
  6. And when the time came, he didn't CLING to his power.
  7. With respect to the SWOT ANALYSIS, the Expert Group had already provided comments.
  8. But if it be a sin to COVET honour, I am the most offending soul alive.
  9. Why can't you be proud of me as a PEER and as my gentleman lover?
  10. Free DELIVERY of flowers and gifts in Moscow.
The third set
  1. We can produce any advertising material you need: brochures, prospectuses, posters, letters, MAILSHOTS, etc.
  2. We must WALK THE WALK, not just TALK THE TALK.
  3. In 2016, she became an ENDORSER of coffee brand Maxwell House.
  4. I'm SAVVY as Jack Sparrow, baby.
  5. In this part of the Internet, you will not find a single lolcat, a single POP-UP ADVERT anywhere.
  6. And then we SCRUTINIZE them, logically and with data.
  7. But, neither brand had the strength to obtain PREMIUM PRICING.
  8. Besides, seeing me, they'd immediately know my INTENT.
  9. Please note that this PRIVACY POLICY may change from time to time.
  10. Some of them even ADVERTISE face creams, cigarettes and the rest.
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